an essay

an essay

Narrative Essay: Tell a story or impart information about your subject in a straightforward, orderly manner, like in a story.
Does your teacher follow the APA guidelines for writing papers? If so, these APA Outline Format Examples should help you pull it all together. As you progress into the meat of the essay (following our tips below), these APA Format Examples should prove beneficial!

The conclusion doesn’t contain new ideas, arguments or evidence.
The conclusion is the final section of an essay or paper. It takes up around 10–20% of your essay. A strong essay conclusion:

An essay
Comparative Essays
Argumentative or Persuasive Essay

Essay maps ask you to predict where your reader will expect background information, counterargument, close analysis of a primary source, or a turn to secondary source material. Essay maps are not concerned with paragraphs so much as with sections of an essay. They anticipate the major argumentative moves you expect your essay to make. Try making your map like this:
“How?” A reader will also want to know whether the claims of the thesis are true in all cases. The corresponding question is “how”: How does the thesis stand up to the challenge of a counterargument? How does the introduction of new material—a new way of looking at the evidence, another set of sources—affect the claims you’re making? Typically, an essay will include at least one “how” section. (Call it “complication” since you’re responding to a reader’s complicating questions.) This section usually comes after the “what,” but keep in mind that an essay may complicate its argument several times depending on its length, and that counterargument alone may appear just about anywhere in an essay.

An essay
The type of essay will depend on what the writer wants to convey to his reader. There are broadly four types of essays. Let us see.

  1. Narrative Essays: This is when the writer is narrating an incident or story through the essay. So these are in the first person. The aim when writing narrative essays is to involve the reader in them as if they were right there when it was happening. So make them as vivid and real as possible. One way to make this possible is to follow the principle of ‘show, don’t tell’. So you must involve the reader in the story.
  2. Descriptive Essays: Here the writer will describe a place, an object, an event or maybe even a memory. But it is not just plainly describing things. The writer must paint a picture through his words. One clever way to do that is to evoke the senses of the reader. Do not only rely on sight but also involve the other senses of smell, touch, sound etc. A descriptive essay when done well will make the reader feel the emotions the writer was feeling at the moment.
  3. Expository Essays: In such an essay a writer presents a balanced study of a topic. To write such an essay, the writer must have real and extensive knowledge about the subject. There is no scope for the writer’s feelings or emotions in an expository essay. It is completely based on facts, statistics, examples etc. There are sub-types here like contrast essays, cause and effect essays etc.
  4. Persuasive Essays: Here the purpose of the essay is to get the reader to your side of the argument. A persuasive essay is not just a presentation of facts but an attempt to convince the reader of the writer’s point of view. Both sides of the argument have to presented in these essays. But the ultimate aim is to persuade the readers that the writer’s argument carries more weight.

References:

http://www.scribbr.com/category/academic-essay/
http://bowvalleycollege.libguides.com/essays
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://www.toppr.com/guides/english/writing/essay/
http://www.wsupress.wayne.edu/books/detail/essayd

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *