Posts By Glenda Ortiz

how to construct an essay

how to construct an essay

If you are given an assignment to write a one-page essay, it would be far too much to write about “the history of the US,” since that could fill entire volumes of books. Instead, you could write about a specific event within the history of the United States: perhaps signing the Declaration of Independence or when Columbus discovered the Americas.
Choose the best topic idea from among your list and begin moving forward on writing your essay. But, before you move forward, take heed of these topics to avoid.

A typical essay contains many different kinds of information, often located in specialized parts or sections. Even short essays perform several different operations: introducing the argument, analyzing data, raising counterarguments, concluding. Introductions and conclusions have fixed places, but other parts don’t. Counterargument, for example, may appear within a paragraph, as a free-standing section, as part of the beginning, or before the ending. Background material (historical context or biographical information, a summary of relevant theory or criticism, the definition of a key term) often appears at the beginning of the essay, between the introduction and the first analytical section, but might also appear near the beginning of the specific section to which it’s relevant.
“How?” A reader will also want to know whether the claims of the thesis are true in all cases. The corresponding question is “how”: How does the thesis stand up to the challenge of a counterargument? How does the introduction of new material—a new way of looking at the evidence, another set of sources—affect the claims you’re making? Typically, an essay will include at least one “how” section. (Call it “complication” since you’re responding to a reader’s complicating questions.) This section usually comes after the “what,” but keep in mind that an essay may complicate its argument several times depending on its length, and that counterargument alone may appear just about anywhere in an essay.

How to construct an essay
Read and reread your paper to ensure the sentences are sensible and paragraphs flow into each other smoothly. Check the grammar, spelling, and punctuation make necessary corrections. Delete any irrelevant sections; improve expressions by changing the vocabulary. Ensure you meet the word count. Now write up your final draft and submit it before the deadline.
After getting an overview of the essay, you will be in a better position to choose a more relevant topic. Begin by brainstorming, sit down, be calm and start a free flow of thoughts and jot down ideas. Narrow your focus and choose an interesting topic depending on the type of essay and purpose so you can create a top notch essay. If you find it hard to come up with an essay topic, ask your teacher for assistance and you will get a topic which you will be required to defend with relevant sources.

How to construct an essay
Don’t let the thought of putting pen to paper daunt you.
These simple steps will guide you through the essay writing process:

Although writing an essay is daunting for many people, it can be pretty straight-forward. This page is a general recipe for constructing an essay, not just in philosophy, but in most other humanities disciplines (such as English, History, Religious Studies, etc.) and perhaps the social sciences. It should be an appropriate guide for writing at the middle school, high school, and lower college levels. The typical assignment I have in mind will be an argumentative essay, in which you argue for something, even if just an interpretation of someone an author’s work.
Also, don’t be afraid to just type without thinking too much about whether it’s any good. You can always go back and edit it. Many people find it best to just sit down and write a lot without much reflection. Just make sure you have enough time to go back and edit.

References:

http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://www.bmmagazine.co.uk/in-business/8-tips-for-writing-an-excellent-essay/
http://lklivingston.tripod.com/essay/
http://www.joshdmay.com/teaching/how-to-essay/
http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/writing/how-to-write-an-essay.html

how to write the

how to write the

Once you have an outline, it’s time to start writing. Write based on the outline itself, fleshing out your basic skeleton to create a whole, cohesive and clear essay.
You might also want to consider the difference between quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing. Quoting is reserved for lines of text that are identical to an original piece of writing. Paraphrasing is reserved for large sections of someone else’s writing that you want to convey in your own words. Summarizing puts the main points from someone else’s text into your own words. Here’s more on When to Quote, Paraphrase, or Summarize.

The introduction is important both to grab the reader’s interest and to inform them of what will be covered in the essay. The introduction generally comprises 10–20% of the text. To learn how to write an essay introduction, start by getting familiar with its most important goals.
Let’s say you are writing an essay about the development of Braille (the reading and writing system used by visually impaired people). The hook could be something like this:

Near the beginning of each paragraph, I’ve used a good topic sentence.

  • Read it carefully, looking for anything confusing you might need to clarify with your professor.
  • Identify the assignment goal, deadline, length specifications, formatting and submission method.
  • Make a bulleted list of the key points, then go back and cross completed items off as you’re writing.

Use our downloadable Academic Paper Checklist to ensure all your academic papers are complete and correctly structured:
Writing is a process, and no two people write in the same way. We recommend following these steps when writing your paper, and remember that it is okay to jump between steps if you need to do more thinking or researching as you write.

This is the way to think about writing decades using numbers: they are both abbreviations and plurals. A shorter way of saying “My mother was born in the 1940s” is “My mother was born in the ’40s.” The apostrophe (not an opening single quotation mark) indicates where the two century digits would be, had they been included. There is no need to put an apostrophe between the zero and the s—that would incorrectly indicate a possessive.
The key to overcoming your struggle with dates is to understand the prevailing conventions and then apply them clearly—and consistently.

References:

http://www.scribbr.com/category/academic-essay/
http://www.scribbr.com/category/research-paper/
http://writingcenter.ashford.edu/writing-a-paper
http://www.grammarly.com/blog/how-to-write-dates/
http://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/length/

goodessay

goodessay

Of, if MLA is your teacher’s preferred style, check out these MLA Format Examples.
Choose the best topic idea from among your list and begin moving forward on writing your essay. But, before you move forward, take heed of these topics to avoid.

Your map should naturally take you through some preliminary answers to the basic questions of what, how, and why. It is not a contract, though—the order in which the ideas appear is not a rigid one. Essay maps are flexible; they evolve with your ideas.
The focus of such an essay predicts its structure. It dictates the information readers need to know and the order in which they need to receive it. Thus your essay‘s structure is necessarily unique to the main claim you’re making. Although there are guidelines for constructing certain classic essay types (e.g., comparative analysis), there are no set formula.

Goodessay
A comparative essay requires comparison and/or contrast of at least two or more items. It:
A narrative essay tells a story or describes an event in order to illustrate a key point or idea. It:

Goodessay
Writing may be the core task, but reading is equally important. Before you start writing your essay, you should conduct a broad search for relevant literature. Learning how to sift through a large amount of data is an important academic skill. You should start by searching through databases – Google Scholar is a great tool for this – using key words related to your research topic. Once you find an article that sounds promising, read through the abstract to ensure that it’s relevant.
Another common issue – particularly amongst first and second-year undergraduates – is that they tend to use rather non-academic language:

Goodessay
For students who have enough time, they claim to lack necessary skills to come up with a top-notch essay. They sometimes claim that writing is boring and they don’t even know where to begin. With this simple tips and tricks, you can successfully and confidently write your essay. Follow each step-by-step. Here are the tips:
This is the part of the essay that you are supposed to explain, describe or argue the topic. The main ideas you wrote down on your outline becomes separate paragraphs. Each paragraph carries the main idea. The paragraph begins with an introductory sentence which carries the main idea. Supporting ideas follow suit in sentence format backed with relevant information and examples. Don’t forget to cite every reference materials used. Direct quotes must also be cited using the required format style.

References:

http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://bowvalleycollege.libguides.com/essays
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/essay-writing-tips/
http://www.bmmagazine.co.uk/in-business/8-tips-for-writing-an-excellent-essay/
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure

how do you write a final essay

how do you write a final essay

  • Conclude with a quotation from or reference to a primary or secondary source, one that amplifies your main point or puts it in a different perspective. A quotation from, say, the novel or poem you’re writing about can add texture and specificity to your discussion; a critic or scholar can help confirm or complicate your final point. For example, you might conclude an essay on the idea of home in James Joyce’s short story collection, Dubliners, with information about Joyce’s own complex feelings towards Dublin, his home. Or you might end with a biographer’s statement about Joyce’s attitude toward Dublin, which could illuminate his characters’ responses to the city. Just be cautious, especially about using secondary material: make sure that you get the last word.
  • Conclude by setting your discussion into a different, perhaps larger, context. For example, you might end an essay on nineteenth-century muckraking journalism by linking it to a current news magazine program like 60 Minutes.
  • Conclude by redefining one of the key terms of your argument. For example, an essay on Marx’s treatment of the conflict between wage labor and capital might begin with Marx’s claim that the “capitalist economy is . . . a gigantic enterprise ofdehumanization“; the essay might end by suggesting that Marxist analysis is itself dehumanizing because it construes everything in economic — rather than moral or ethical– terms.
  • Conclude by considering the implications of your argument (or analysis or discussion). What does your argument imply, or involve, or suggest? For example, an essay on the novel Ambiguous Adventure, by the Senegalese writer Cheikh Hamidou Kane, might open with the idea that the protagonist’s development suggests Kane’s belief in the need to integrate Western materialism and Sufi spirituality in modern Senegal. The conclusion might make the new but related point that the novel on the whole suggests that such an integration is (or isn’t) possible.

So much is at stake in writing a conclusion. This is, after all, your last chance to persuade your readers to your point of view, to impress yourself upon them as a writer and thinker. And the impression you create in your conclusion will shape the impression that stays with your readers after they’ve finished the essay.

How do you write a final essay
If alarm bells are starting to ring at the mention of rhetoric, quiet them. Rhetoric gets a bad name in public discourse. Phrases like “pure rhetoric” or “empty rhetoric” are often used to suggest that an utterance lacks substance or integrity, or is somehow dishonest or insincere. And those are the last things you want your reader to take away from reading your essay! But rhetoric is one of the oldest scholarly disciplines in the world. In Classical societies – and in fact right up to the beginning of the twentieth century – it was considered one of the most important disciplines throughout Western society. The fact that it’s acquired something of a bad name over the last hundred years or so doesn’t mean it’s not still the foundation of good writing.
But your customers will also want to know other details: can they let the property while they’re not using it, for example? What kind of returns will that bring, and will these be enough to offset the purchase price? How are properties taxed in the area? And how about the facilities the local authority will provide? What kind of sanitation and waste facilities does the property have? Is it connected to a sewer or does it use a septic tank?

How do you write a final essay

  • Restate thesis statement;
  • Get the main idea from the first paragraph of your essay body;
  • Get the main idea from the second paragraph of your essay body;
  • Get the main idea from the third paragraph of your essay body;
  • Conclude all your main thoughts. Answer the most valuable questions of your paper.

Let’s start with argumentative essay conclusion example.

How do you write a final essay
In a conclusion paragraph, you summarize what you’ve written about in your paper. When you’re writing a good conclusion paragraph, you need to think about the main point that you want to get across and be sure it’s included. If you’ve already written a fabulous introductory paragraph, you can write something similar with different wording. Here are some points to remember:

  • Use your introductory paragraph as a guide. You may have started by saying, “There are three classes at school that I absolutely can’t wait to go to every day.” You can start your conclusion by saying, “Gym, Math, and Art are the three classes I try to never miss.”
  • If it’s a longer paper, a good place to start is by looking at what each paragraph was about. For example, if you write a paper about zoo animals, each paragraph would probably be about one particular animal. In your conclusion, you should briefly mention each animal again. “Zoo animals like polar bears, lions, and giraffes are amazing creatures.”
  • Leave your readers with something to think about. Suggest that they learn more with a sentence like, “We have a lot to learn about global warming.” You can also give them something to do after reading your paper. For example, “It’s easy to make your own popsicles. Grab some orange juice and give it a try!”

How do you write a final essay
The final paragraph in an essay summarises the content of the essay. The first sentence of the final paragraph is often another summary of the thesis and supporting evidence. Subsequent sentences discuss the topic in a wider context in light of the evidence presented in the essay, with each sentence gradually expanding the scope. The last sentence of the essay connects the topic with the broader interests of the reader, often addressing the future.
The above essay is actually a meta-essay, in that it is written in the precise form that it describes. The key to writing such an essay is planning. How does one plan such a well-structured essay?

References:

http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/how-to-conclude-your-essay-well/
http://writemyessay4me.org/blog/essay-conclusion-examples
http://www.time4writing.com/writing-resources/writing-a-good-conclusion-paragraph/
http://medium.com/@richarddmorey/how-to-write-a-well-structured-essay-48a961cda42e
http://www.pioneerspost.com/business-school/20151030/the-essay-part-1-which-label-introduction

harvard writing center conclusions

harvard writing center conclusions

To establish a sense of closure, you might do one or more of the following:

  • Don’t simply summarize your essay. A brief summary of your argument may be useful, especially if your essay is long–more than ten pages or so. But shorter essays tend not to require a restatement of your main ideas.
  • Avoid phrases like “in conclusion,” “to conclude,” “in summary,” and “to sum up.” These phrases can be useful–even welcome–in oral presentations. But readers can see, by the tell-tale compression of the pages, when an essay is about to end. You’ll irritate your audience if you belabor the obvious.
  • Resist the urge to apologize. If you’ve immersed yourself in your subject, you now know a good deal more about it than you can possibly include in a five- or ten- or 20-page essay. As a result, by the time you’ve finished writing, you may be having some doubts about what you’ve produced. (And if you haven’t immersed yourself in your subject, you may be feeling even more doubtful about your essay as you approach the conclusion.) Repress those doubts. Don’t undercut your authority by saying things like, “this is just one approach to the subject; there may be other, better approaches. . .”

Your map should naturally take you through some preliminary answers to the basic questions of what, how, and why. It is not a contract, though—the order in which the ideas appear is not a rigid one. Essay maps are flexible; they evolve with your ideas.
Structuring your essay according to a reader’s logic means examining your thesis and anticipating what a reader needs to know, and in what sequence, in order to grasp and be convinced by your argument as it unfolds. The easiest way to do this is to map the essay‘s ideas via a written narrative. Such an account will give you a preliminary record of your ideas, and will allow you to remind yourself at every turn of the reader’s needs in understanding your idea.

Harvard writing center conclusions
But your customers will also want to know other details: can they let the property while they’re not using it, for example? What kind of returns will that bring, and will these be enough to offset the purchase price? How are properties taxed in the area? And how about the facilities the local authority will provide? What kind of sanitation and waste facilities does the property have? Is it connected to a sewer or does it use a septic tank?
Your essay conclusion is your parting shot. It’s your opportunity to leave your reader with a favourable impression of the arguments you’ve just made. You want them, at minimum, to be convinced that you’ve achieved what you set out to achieve; that you’ve proved your points. Better yet, you want them to feel satisfied that you’ve taken them on an intellectual journey that was interesting and rewarding.

Harvard writing center conclusions
Ending with a sense of closure, linking the first paragraph back to your conclusion, will answer all lingering questions that may have surrounded your paper (Harvard). In order to bring this closure, you can evoke a vivid image that allows the reader to clearly envision your point (Richmond). Also, to make sure your conclusion is serving its purpose, remind the reader of your thesis statement and answer the question, “So what?” (Webster). Finally, you should aim to synthesize, not summarize: Include a brief summary of the paper’s main points, but don’t simply repeat things that were in your paper. Here, you should show your reader how the points you made are supported and how the examples you used fit together (UNC-Chapel Hill). These are just a couple of strategies that have worked well for writers when forming conclusions, and the WRC always keeps these tools in mind.
Our friends at writing centers across the country have published similar works that aid in writing a conclusion, all emphasizing how paramount having an ending with sufficient closure is, as well as some helpful hints of what works well when crafting a conclusion:

“Strategies for Writing a Conclusion” from Literacy Education Online
“Conclusions” from the Writing Center at the University of North Carolina
Revision: Just say what we should recognize.

References:

http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/how-to-conclude-your-essay-well/
http://pages.uncc.edu/unccwrc/blog/2017/06/02/in-conclusion/
http://www.lib.sfu.ca/about/branches-depts/slc/writing/organization/conclusions
http://literarydevices.net/types-of-essay/

what is an essay format

what is an essay format

It’s helpful to think of the different essay sections as answering a series of questions your reader might ask when encountering your thesis. (Readers should have questions. If they don’t, your thesis is most likely simply an observation of fact, not an arguable claim.)
“What?” The first question to anticipate from a reader is “what”: What evidence shows that the phenomenon described by your thesis is true? To answer the question you must examine your evidence, thus demonstrating the truth of your claim. This “what” or “demonstration” section comes early in the essay, often directly after the introduction. Since you’re essentially reporting what you’ve observed, this is the part you might have most to say about when you first start writing. But be forewarned: it shouldn’t take up much more than a third (often much less) of your finished essay. If it does, the essay will lack balance and may read as mere summary or description.

What is an essay format
It is important not to introduce any new ideas in the conclusion – it is simply a reminder of what your essay has already covered. It may be useful again to refer back to the title in the conclusion to make it very clear to the examiner that you have thoroughly answered the question at hand. Make sure you remind them of your argument by very concisely touching on each key point.
So how do you structure academic writing? What is the best essay structure format?

What is an essay format
Citations are listed alphabetically on the works cited / reference page.
Before you even begin writing, make sure that you are acquainted with the information that you are working with. Find compelling arguments and counterpoints, trivia, facts, etc. The sky is the limit when it comes to gathering information.

What is an essay format
There is plenty of scopes to get creative in the introduction of essays. This will ensure that you hook the reader, i.e. draw and keep his attention. So to do so you can start with a quote or a proverb. Sometimes you can even start with a definition. Another interesting strategy to engage with your reader is to start with a question.
Q: What is a thesis statement of essays?

What is an essay format
That said, an outline will help you write academic works better and faster. And while our writers are always here to help, it can’t hurt to learn how to write an outline for an essay by your own, right?
Finally, outline your essay conclusion. Restate your thesis and write a concluding statement, aka a sentence addressing the importance of your thesis and proposing solutions to the problem you addressed in the essay.

References:

http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/how-to-structure-an-essay/
http://essaypro.com/blog/essay-format/
http://www.toppr.com/guides/english/writing/essay/
http://bid4papers.com/blog/essay-outline/
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/how-to-structure-an-essay/

sample essay format

sample essay format

To write an argumentative essay, it’s important to research and back up what you say in the text. For more detail, here are some argumentative essay writing tips.

“Throw out the bottles and boxes of drugs in your house. A new theory suggests that medicine could be bad for your health, which should at least come as good news to people who cannot afford to buy expensive medicine. However, it is a blow to the medicine industry, and an even bigger blow to our confidence in the progress of science. This new theory argues that healing is at our fingertips: we can be healthy by doing Reiki on on a regular basis.”

Sample essay format
This should be the fourth or fifth time you have repeated your thesis so while you should use a variety of word choice in the body paragraphs it is a acceptable idea to use some (but not all) of the original language you used in the introduction. This echoing effect not only reinforces your argument but also ties it nicely to the second key element of the conclusion: a brief (two or three words is enough) review of the three main points from the body of the paper.
Although it may seem like a waste of time – especially during exams where time is tight – it is almost always better to brainstorm a bit before beginning your essay. This should enable you to find the best supporting ideas – rather than simply the first ones that come to mind – and position them in your essay accordingly.

Sample essay format
There isn’t one proper way of writing a paper, but there are solid guidelines to sustain a consistent workflow. Be it a college application essay, a research paper, informative essay, etc. There is a standard essay format that you should follow. For easier access, the following outline will be divided into steps:
Alright, let’s carry over to the APA style specifics.

Sample essay format
When outlining your essay, keep them in mind so you wouldn’t miss any arguments, evidence, and examples while writing.
That said, an outline will help you write academic works better and faster. And while our writers are always here to help, it can’t hurt to learn how to write an outline for an essay by your own, right?

Sample essay format

  • Add the header to your essay in the right-hand corner half an inch below the top edge of the paper. You must do this for every page of your paper with the exception of the works cited page.
  • In the upper left hand corner of your paper place the heading
  • Insert and center the title of your essay an inch below the top edge of your paper.
  • Immediately beneath the title, begin writing the first paragraph of your title.
  • The example below shows what it should look like when you are done:

Every type of academic work, whether it is a short essay or a dissertation, has an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. In a five-paragraph essay, two paragraphs would be dedicated to introduction and conclusion, while other three – to the main body (this is the bulk of the essay where arguments are made and evidence is provided). Once you learn how to write a typical five paragraph essay consisting of these parts, writing any paper, no matter how short or long, becomes much easier.

References:

http://www.internationalstudent.com/essay_writing/essay_tips/
http://essaypro.com/blog/essay-format/
http://bid4papers.com/blog/essay-outline/
http://edubirdie.com/blog/essay-format
http://www.bmmagazine.co.uk/in-business/8-tips-for-writing-an-excellent-essay/

essay types

essay types

Essay types
There are various opinions on how to categorize essays and how many types of essay there are. The simplest interpretation says that there are only four types of essays:
This type of essay involves a step by step explanation of how something happens or is done. Getting your steps in the correct order is important if you don’t want to turn your process into a muddle. Write your process essay in chronological order.

Generally, a simple a five-paragraph has five paragraphs including an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. An argumentative essay, however, has an additional paragraph which presents counter argument or opposing arguments in the same sequence. However, at the end of this paragraph, both the arguments are weighed in the favor of stronger arguments presented earlier in three body paragraphs.
An essay is a short academic composition. The word “essay” is derived from a French word “essai” or “essayer,” which mean “trail.” In composition, however, an essay is a piece of non-fiction writing that talks or discusses a specific topic. Presently, essay is part of every degree program.

The University of Victoria uses this sample essay to demonstrate the importance of straightforward clarity in an expository essay.
An argumentative essay from Bogazici University offers a bit of a dramatic flair, which is important to making a strong argument.

Essay types
Effectively writing different types of essays has become critical to academic success. Essay writing is a common school assignment, a part of standardized tests, and a requirement on college applications. Often on tests, choosing the correct type of essay to write in response to a writing prompt is key to getting the question right. Clearly, students can’t afford to remain confused about types of essays.
There are over a dozen types of essays, so it’s easy to get confused. However, rest assured, the number is actually more manageable. Essentially there are four major types of essays, with the variations making up the remainder.

Essay types
Being overwhelmed with multiple writing assignments makes students purchase custom essays online. Professional writers are able to write any essay within the timeframe without forcing a customer to waste a lot of money.
Being a mix of cultures, the United States often initiate activities to unite various nations. School & college teachers assign cultural identity essays to let native students understand the international peers better based on their customs and traditions. A cultural identity essay covers many things. The essay may include the information about personal viewpoints, religion, customs, traditions, language, reasons to move to the US, etc. Do not confuse it with a personal essay! Cultural identity does not focus on a single person – write about a group of individuals with an interesting, rich cultural background.

References:

http://literarydevices.net/types-of-essay/
http://examples.yourdictionary.com/essay-examples.html
http://www.time4writing.com/writing-resources/types-of-essays/
http://writemyessay4me.org/blog/5-different-types-of-essays
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/how-to-structure-an-essay/

how do u write an essay

how do u write an essay

How do u write an essay
You may download a .pdf formatted file containing these instructions which can then be easily printed.
These simple steps will guide you through the essay writing process:

The first step to writing an essay is to define what type of essay you are writing. There are four main categories into which essays can be grouped:
Reread your introduction and conclusion. Will the reader walk away knowing exactly what your paper was about?

Finish the introduction with an overview of your essay’s structure. The overview should provide the reader with a general idea of what each section of your essay explores.
The conclusion doesn’t just summarize, but draws connections between arguments.

How do u write an essay
A one sentence body paragraph that simply cites the example of “George Washington” or “LeBron James” is not enough, however. No, following this an effective essay will follow up on this topic sentence by explaining to the reader, in detail, who or what an example is and, more importantly, why that example is relevant.
In the end, though, remember that good writing does not happen by accident. Although we have endeavored to explain everything that goes into effective essay writing in as clear and concise a way as possible, it is much easier in theory than it is in practice.

How do u write an essay
After creating a thesis statement and the body of the essay write an introductory paragraph. Make your introduction fascinating to capture the attention of your readers. Begin with a ‘hook’; you can use a story, dialogue, shocking revelation, a quote or a topic summary. Make sure that your ‘hook’ ties with the thesis statement.
At this stage, you’ll need a laptop to start writing the essay. It’s best to use one that’s particularly comfortable due to the hours it will take to craft. To find one that’s suitable, you can check out the best laptop for writers which is based on the ergonomic design of the device to make it easy for essay writers. This recommendation is from LaptopUnboxed.com which is a website that specializes in reviewing laptops and electronics.

References:

http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/writing/how-to-write-an-essay.html
http://www.scribbr.com/category/academic-essay/
http://www.internationalstudent.com/essay_writing/essay_tips/
http://www.bmmagazine.co.uk/in-business/8-tips-for-writing-an-excellent-essay/
http://www.oxfordcollege.ac/news/write-scientific-essay/

how to write long essays

how to write long essays

How to write long essays
In most cases, your assignment will include clear guidelines on the number of words or pages you are expected to write. Often this will be a range rather than an exact number (for example, 2500–3000 words, or 10–12 pages). If you’re not sure, always check with your instructor.
As you make an outline of your essay, make sure you have a clear idea of how much evidence, detail and argumentation will be needed to support your thesis. If you find that you don’t have enough ideas to fill out the word count, or that you need more space to make a convincing case, then consider revising your thesis to be more general or more specific.

How to write long essays
At the end of the day, writing a paper is still a lot of work. But if you follow the process in this article, you’ll be able to do it more quickly without a loss of quality.
If you’re not convinced, consider this: I rarely wrote more than the minimum page count, and I consistently received A’s on papers in English, History, Religious Studies, and Education classes.

How to write long essays
A strong introduction should read something like this:
Always develop an introduction that clearly sets out the aims of what you are about to write and, if applicable, refers to the subject under investigation. State what the essay will try to achieve and briefly mention some of the main points you will consider. The idea is to give the marker an overview of your argument, to show that your thought process is logical and coherent and that you have carefully thought the question through. Don’t try to go into any of your key points in depth in your introduction – they will each be covered by a full paragraph later on. If the question is an ‘either or’ or a ‘how far do you agree’ question, it is useful to set out both sides of the argument briefly in the introduction in preparation for exploring the two sides later in the essay.

Writing an academic essay means fashioning a coherent set of ideas into an argument. Because essays are essentially linear—they offer one idea at a time—they must present their ideas in the order that makes most sense to a reader. Successfully structuring an essay means attending to a reader’s logic.
Answering Questions: The Parts of an Essay

How to write long essays
If you’ve been provided a comprehensive prompt or rubric for an essay, read it, and read it again. Think about the following:

  • Did you answer all of the questions in the prompt?
  • Did you provide supporting evidence to back up whatever claims you made?
  • Did you leave out any information that might increase the reader’s understanding of your argument?
  • Did you meet all requirements (besides length) for the paper?

References:

http://collegeinfogeek.com/write-excellent-papers-quickly/
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/how-to-structure-an-essay/
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://www.easybib.com/guides/how-to-make-a-paper-longer-the-smart-way/
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure