different essay structures

different essay structures

Different essay structures
Sentence 2- Explain problem
Conclusion

Different essay structures

  1. Expository
  2. Descriptive
  3. Narrative
  4. Compare-&-contrast
  5. Persuasive/argumentative

Among different types of writing, an informative essay is the most common. One may argue that any essay contains certain information. An informative essay writing, unlike other types of essays, should cover the topic with the help of detailed descriptions, special terms, and in-depth analysis supported by the credible evidence. A writer should be a real expert in the chosen subject to come up with a powerful essay.

Different essay structures
Overall, whilst it is certainly true that the characters, plots and settings of Gothic fiction seem firmly intended to break normal moral and social codes, the great incidence within the genre of the depiction of the supernatural, and in particular its insistent reference to social injustice and hypocrisy might suggest that in fact its main purpose was the criticism and reform of society.
It is certainly true that many works of Gothic fiction manifest the transgression of normal moral and social codes as their major theme. Their emphasis on female sexuality, their breaking of the boundaries between life and death and their shocking displays of immoral religious characters would all suggest that this is indeed the case. However, it is also important to consider other major aspects of the genre that might be considered equally important in purpose, such as its fascination with the supernatural, its portrayal of artificial humanity and its satirical social attacks. This essay will explore these conflicting purposes with reference to several different Gothic texts to discover what might be best described as the ‘main’ purpose of the genre.

Different essay structures
There are over a dozen types of essays, so it’s easy to get confused. However, rest assured, the number is actually more manageable. Essentially there are four major types of essays, with the variations making up the remainder.

  • 1. Narrative Essays: Telling a Story
    In a narrative essay, the writer tells a story about a real-life experience. While telling a story may sound easy to do, the narrative essay challenges students to think and write about themselves. When writing a narrative essay, writers should try to involve the reader by making the story as vivid as possible. The fact that narrative essays are usually written in the first person helps engage the reader. “I” sentences give readers a feeling of being part of the story. A well-crafted narrative essay will also build towards drawing a conclusion or making a personal statement.
  • 2. Descriptive Essays: Painting a Picture
    A cousin of the narrative essay, a descriptive essay paints a picture with words. A writer might describe a person, place, object, or even memory of special significance. However, this type of essay is not description for description’s sake. The descriptive essay strives to communicate a deeper meaning through the description. In a descriptive essay, the writer should show, not tell, through the use of colorful words and sensory details. The best descriptive essays appeal to the reader’s emotions, with a result that is highly evocative.
  • 3. Expository Essays: Just the Facts
    The expository essay is an informative piece of writing that presents a balanced analysis of a topic. In an expository essay, the writer explains or defines a topic, using facts, statistics, and examples. Expository writing encompasses a wide range of essay variations, such as the comparison and contrast essay, the cause and effect essay, and the “how to” or process essay. Because expository essays are based on facts and not personal feelings, writers don’t reveal their emotions or write in the first person.
  • 4. Persuasive Essays: Convince Me
    While like an expository essay in its presentation of facts, the goal of the persuasive essay is to convince the reader to accept the writer’s point of view or recommendation. The writer must build a case using facts and logic, as well as examples, expert opinion, and sound reasoning. The writer should present all sides of the argument, but must be able to communicate clearly and without equivocation why a certain position is correct.
    1. Introduction
      • Background information on topic
      • Overall point of view of the topic (thesis)
      • Overview of components to be discussed (structure)
    2. Body paragraphs
      • paragraph 1
        1. Topic sentence outlining first component
        2. Sentences giving explanations and providing evidence to support topic sentence
        3. Concluding sentence – link to next paragraph
      • paragraph 2
        1. Topic sentence outlining second component
        2. Sentences giving explanations and providing evidence to back topic sentence
        3. Concluding sentence – link to next paragraph
      • Following body paragraphs
        1. These follow the same structure for as many components as you need to outline
    3. Conclusion
      • Summary of the main points of the body
      • Restatement of the main point of view
      • Justification/evaluation (if required by task)

Examples of this type of essay include questions which ask you to take a position on a topic, such as a particular decision or policy, and present arguments which support your position. An effective way to argue a point can be to present the opposing view first then counter this view with stronger evidence.

References:

http://writemyessay4me.org/blog/5-different-types-of-essays
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/how-to-structure-an-essay/
http://www.time4writing.com/writing-resources/types-of-essays/
http://courses.lumenlearning.com/vccs-enf102-17fa/chapter/text-types-of-essays-and-suggested-structures/
http://olympus.sandhills.edu/english/wordguide/mlaformat.html

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