how to properly write an essay

how to properly write an essay

Essays are common in middle school, high school and college. You may even need to write essays in the business world (although they are usually called “reports” at that point). An essay is defined as “a short piece of writing that expresses information as well as the writer’s opinion.”
Support your thesis adequately with the information in your paragraphs. Each paragraph should have its own topic sentence. This is the most important sentence in the paragraph that tells readers what the rest of the paragraph will be about.

How to properly write an essay
If you follow a few simple steps, you will find that the essay almost writes itself. You will be responsible only for supplying ideas, which are the important part of the essay anyway.
You may find that you have questions about writing an essay that this site does not answer. Many other sites have additional information about writing an essay, including information about more complex issues such as handling citations and bibliographies.

How to properly write an essay
Before you begin your writing, create your essay outline. Jot your topic in the middle of your page, draw lines branching from the topic and write main ideas at the end of each line. From the main ideas at the end of the lines draw more lines and include your thoughts.

  • Give statistics
  • Information on the subject
  • Research on the topic
  • Relevant data if any

The idea of tactile reading was not entirely new; Louis Braille adapted and simplified existing methods to create the first writing system specifically for blind people. But its success depended on acceptance among sighted people before the social status of blindness could truly be transformed, and this process was shaped by broader debates about disabled people’s place in society.
The conclusion doesn’t contain new ideas, arguments or evidence.

How to properly write an essay
Here is an example of a body paragraph to continue the essay begun above:
Transitional phrases are useful for showing the reader where one section ends and another begins. It may be helpful to see them as the written equivalent of the kinds of spoken cues used in formal speeches that signal the end of one set of ideas and the beginning of another. In essence, they lead the reader from one section of the paragraph of another.

References:

http://lklivingston.tripod.com/essay/
http://www.bmmagazine.co.uk/in-business/8-tips-for-writing-an-excellent-essay/
http://www.scribbr.com/category/academic-essay/
http://www.internationalstudent.com/essay_writing/essay_tips/
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure

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