how to write the

how to write the

Once you have an outline, it’s time to start writing. Write based on the outline itself, fleshing out your basic skeleton to create a whole, cohesive and clear essay.
You might also want to consider the difference between quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing. Quoting is reserved for lines of text that are identical to an original piece of writing. Paraphrasing is reserved for large sections of someone else’s writing that you want to convey in your own words. Summarizing puts the main points from someone else’s text into your own words. Here’s more on When to Quote, Paraphrase, or Summarize.

The introduction is important both to grab the reader’s interest and to inform them of what will be covered in the essay. The introduction generally comprises 10–20% of the text. To learn how to write an essay introduction, start by getting familiar with its most important goals.
Let’s say you are writing an essay about the development of Braille (the reading and writing system used by visually impaired people). The hook could be something like this:

Near the beginning of each paragraph, I’ve used a good topic sentence.

  • Read it carefully, looking for anything confusing you might need to clarify with your professor.
  • Identify the assignment goal, deadline, length specifications, formatting and submission method.
  • Make a bulleted list of the key points, then go back and cross completed items off as you’re writing.

Use our downloadable Academic Paper Checklist to ensure all your academic papers are complete and correctly structured:
Writing is a process, and no two people write in the same way. We recommend following these steps when writing your paper, and remember that it is okay to jump between steps if you need to do more thinking or researching as you write.

This is the way to think about writing decades using numbers: they are both abbreviations and plurals. A shorter way of saying “My mother was born in the 1940s” is “My mother was born in the ’40s.” The apostrophe (not an opening single quotation mark) indicates where the two century digits would be, had they been included. There is no need to put an apostrophe between the zero and the s—that would incorrectly indicate a possessive.
The key to overcoming your struggle with dates is to understand the prevailing conventions and then apply them clearly—and consistently.

References:

http://www.scribbr.com/category/academic-essay/
http://www.scribbr.com/category/research-paper/
http://writingcenter.ashford.edu/writing-a-paper
http://www.grammarly.com/blog/how-to-write-dates/
http://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/length/

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