tips to make a good essay

tips to make a good essay

Tips to make a good essay
Each teacher gives out homework, and at the end of the day, the students are overburdened. To lessen this burden order a paper from custom essay writing service and spend your time revising for your exams. Using professional essay writer can also save you from the unhealthy sleepless nights and embarrassing grades plus late submissions.
At this stage, you’ll need a laptop to start writing the essay. It’s best to use one that’s particularly comfortable due to the hours it will take to craft. To find one that’s suitable, you can check out the best laptop for writers which is based on the ergonomic design of the device to make it easy for essay writers. This recommendation is from LaptopUnboxed.com which is a website that specializes in reviewing laptops and electronics.

Tips to make a good essay
By setting deadlines for yourself and committing to stick to them, you are ensuring that you won’t be left with too much work right before your hand-in date. It is also important that you leave time, ideally a couple of days, between finishing your first draft and proofreading.
Both the quoted and the paraphrased versions carry essentially the same meaning, with the exception that paraphrasing shows slightly wider knowledge of Bourdieu (through mentioning another form of capital), and presents an argument that, while true to the writings of Bourdieu, better fits the overall argument.

For example, to write an essay, you should generally:
Don’t jumble too many ideas in each paragraph or the reader may become confused.

Tips to make a good essay

In the end, then, one thing is clear: mistakes do far more to help us learn and improve than successes. As examples from both science and everyday experience can attest, if we treat each mistake not as a misstep but as a learning experience the possibilities for self-improvement are limitless.

Examples should be relevant to the thesis and so should the explanatory details you provide for them. It can be hard to summarize the full richness of a given example in just a few lines so make them count. If you are trying to explain why George Washington is a great example of a strong leader, for instance, his childhood adventure with the cherry tree (though interesting in another essay) should probably be skipped over.

Tips to make a good essay
Before you even start writing an essay, it is important to know what you want to say. The easiest way to narrow down a thesis and create a proper argument is to make a basic outline before you begin writing your essay. The basic structure of an academic essay includes the following elements: an introduction that includes the thesis; the body of the essay, which should include separate paragraphs discussing evidence that supports the thesis; and a conclusion that ties everything together and connects it to the thesis. When it comes to how much evidence should be included in an academic essay, a good guideline is to include at least three solid points that directly support your thesis.
Image source: Jeremy Bishop/Unsplash.com

References:

http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/essay-writing-tips/
http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/writing/how-to-write-an-essay.html
http://www.internationalstudent.com/essay_writing/essay_tips/
http://www.scribendi.com/advice/academic_essay_writing_skills.en.html
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure

harvard essay format

harvard essay format

Essay maps ask you to predict where your reader will expect background information, counterargument, close analysis of a primary source, or a turn to secondary source material. Essay maps are not concerned with paragraphs so much as with sections of an essay. They anticipate the major argumentative moves you expect your essay to make. Try making your map like this:
“Why?” Your reader will also want to know what’s at stake in your claim: Why does your interpretation of a phenomenon matter to anyone beside you? This question addresses the larger implications of your thesis. It allows your readers to understand your essay within a larger context. In answering “why”, your essay explains its own significance. Although you might gesture at this question in your introduction, the fullest answer to it properly belongs at your essay‘s end. If you leave it out, your readers will experience your essay as unfinished—or, worse, as pointless or insular.

Harvard essay format
Unlike other citation styles, there is no single, definitive version of Harvard Style. Therefore, you may see a variation in features such as punctuation, capitalization, abbreviations, and the use of italics.
Harvard Style will affect your paper in two places:

Harvard essay format
Very often we have to quote somebody else’s thoughts. Some students think that this is forbidden because of plagiarism issues. Well, this is not so. If you properly quoted somebody else’s thoughts this will be a quotation. When quoting in Harvard style you have to use brackets in which you state the author, year of the book or study was published and the page number. There are different options in Harvard citation style. For example, you may write a quotation and state information about the author at the end of it. Alternatively you can start your quotation with “Author X claims that” placing reference information just after the author’s name.
In case you lack experience in essay writing you should certainly look for a sample Harvard essay in order to have an example/guide on how to write a nice essay. Keep in mind that you have to search for example essays only at web site of professional essay writing companies or other reliable sources of information otherwise you can be misled on the entire essay writing process. Proffessays.com offers customers and visitors free sample Harvard essays.

Harvard essay format
– Use the proper appearance of in-text citations. Your citations in such writing style are considered to be parenthetical. So use the author’s full surname and the year when his job was published. Sometimes it is also allowed to use page numbers.
The reference list must contain the list of sources which will be used in the paper. The idea is quite simple: if you use any borrowed ideas, you should place the author and his job in this list. All cited parts are required to be described in a proper way.

Harvard essay format
Edited Source
For newspapers, articles, chapter titles, and Web pages:

References:

http://libguides.mjc.edu/c.php?g=255746&p=3205500
http://www.professays.com/essay/harvard-essay-format/
http://paperhelpwriting.com/blog/harvard-style/
http://essaypro.com/blog/harvard-style-citation/
http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/writing/how-to-write-an-essay.html

structure of

structure of

Like the cerebrum, the cerebellum has two hemispheres, separated by a structure called the vermis.
A misunderstanding between the trio resulted in the withdrawal of the two medical men before the structure was completed.

Structure of
To implement such semantic mark up, HTML provides dedicated tags that you can use to represent such sections, for example:
In your HTML code, you can mark up sections of content based on their functionality — you can use elements that represent the sections of content described above unambiguously, and assistive technologies like screenreaders can recognise those elements and help with tasks like “find the main navigation”, or “find the main content.” As we mentioned earlier in the course, there are a number of consequences of not using the right element structure and semantics for the right job.

Structure of
Validation reports contain an assessment of the quality of a structure and highlight specific concerns by considering the coordinates of the model, the experimental data and the fit between the two. Easily interpretable summary information that compares the quality of a model with that of other models in the archive will help users of PDB data to critically assess archived entries and to select the most appropriate structural models for their needs. These reports are developed using the recommendations of thewwPDB Validation Task Forces.

  • PDB Structure Files
  • Ligand Files
  • Secondary Structure Files
  • SIFTS Files

Read More on our HTTP/HTTPS Services

Structure of
The finding could help lay the groundwork for a vaccine
Still, McLellan thinks a vaccine is likely about 18 to 24 months away. That’s “still quite fast compared to normal vaccine development, which might take like 10 years,” he said.

Aside from water, which forms 70 percent of a cell’s mass, a cell is composed mostly of macromolecules. By far the largest portion of macromolecules are the proteins. An average-sized protein macromolecule contains a string of about 400 amino acid molecules. Each amino acid has a different side chain of atoms that interact with the atoms of side chains of other amino acids. These interactions are very specific and cause the entire protein molecule to fold into a compact globular form. In theory, nearly an infinite variety of proteins can be formed, each with a different sequence of amino acids. However, nearly all these proteins would fail to fold in the unique ways required to form efficient functional surfaces and would therefore be useless to the cell. The proteins present in cells of modern animals and humans are products of a long evolutionary history, during which the ancestor proteins were naturally selected for their ability to fold into specific three-dimensional forms with unique functional surfaces useful for cell survival.
Cells are largely composed of compounds that contain carbon. The study of how carbon atoms interact with other atoms in molecular compounds forms the basis of the field of organic chemistry and plays a large role in understanding the basic functions of cells. Because carbon atoms can form stable bonds with four other atoms, they are uniquely suited for the construction of complex molecules. These complex molecules are typically made up of chains and rings that contain hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms, as well as carbon atoms. These molecules may consist of anywhere from 10 to millions of atoms linked together in specific arrays. Most, but not all, of the carbon-containing molecules in cells are built up from members of one of four different families of small organic molecules: sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids. Each of these families contains a group of molecules that resemble one another in both structure and function. In addition to other important functions, these molecules are used to build large macromolecules. For example, the sugars can be linked to form polysaccharides such as starch and glycogen, the amino acids can be linked to form proteins, the nucleotides can be linked to form the DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) and RNA (ribonucleic acid) of chromosomes, and the fatty acids can be linked to form the lipids of all cell membranes.

References:

http://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Learn/HTML/Introduction_to_HTML/Document_and_website_structure
http://www.rcsb.org/
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/researchers-map-structure-of-coronavirus-spike-protein/
http://www.britannica.com/science/cell-biology/The-structure-of-biological-molecules
http://essaydragon.com/blog/literary-analysis-outline

essay outline structure

essay outline structure

Answering Questions: The Parts of an Essay
Signs of Trouble

Essay outline structure
Regardless of whether you’re writing an MLA or APA outline, the organizational process remains the same with some minor differences. The main difference being APA uses abstracts, as it requires one or two sentences per line. APA is used for humanities, as MLA is used more for social studies. Other than that, the simple outline remains the same for any kind of academic paper structure.
The Conclusion: The entire paper should be summarized in the final paragraph, restating the thesis in the first sentence, adding suggestions, predictions, and/or opinions in the sentences that follow. As for the final sentence, it should summarize the goal of the paper.

The body of an essay consists of a series of paragraphs that present your ideas about your thesis statement. Each paragraph covers just one idea, and there are as many paragraphs as you need to develop your thesis statement. Each paragraph starts with a transition sentence that flows from the previous paragraph. The paragraph continues with a topic sentence that contains the point that you’re making in that paragraph. The following sentences support and explain the point. Include examples for illustration and discuss and analyze research that supports your point.
Far from being a school chore, an essay allows you to convince a reader of your viewpoint about a particular topic by presenting your thoughts and arguments in a structured way. Essays have three main parts to their structure — an introduction, the body of the report and the conclusion. In the outline stage of your essay, use this structure to make brief notes about what you’re going to cover and the order in which you want to present your information. For the final draft of the essay, rewrite your notes as complete, grammatically correct sentences.

Essay outline structure
This guide is here to help you:
IV. Body. Paragraph-3

Essay outline structure
Now that you know how to use an essay outline, you are well on your way to writing clear, persuasive essays. This tool will help you improve your writing and earn a higher grade for your essay. Now it’s time for you to get started and make use of this tool.
Integrate paragraphs into your outline. Start fleshing out your section and subsection notes. Your introduction will need to include your topic and thesis statement. For a short essay, this only needs to be one paragraph long. Then, refer to your assignment instructions to clarify the length. Next is the body part – a ‘skeleton’ on which the entire essay is based. This section will consist of several paragraphs, each playing a supportive role in the filling of your thesis. The final section of your outline is the conclusion. This is a summary of everything you have stated in your essay. In this part, paraphrase your thesis statement and highlight the arguments made within the essay to support it. Remember that presenting new ideas and concepts in the concluding sentences is a big academic mistake. Rather, your final words should only emphasize the points you’ve indicated earlier and focus on the already-highlighted ideas.

References:

http://essaypro.com/blog/essay-outline/
http://penandthepad.com/outline-structure-essay-10030053.html
http://bid4papers.com/blog/essay-outline/
http://handmadewriting.com/blog/guides/essay-outline/
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure

essay thesis

essay thesis

“Solo European travel requires independence which, in the end, bolsters personal confidence.” This is much more specific and targeted. Now, you can hone in your research on solo travel through Europe, the need for independence, and its positive effect on personal confidence.
Bad: All retirees should relocate to Florida.
– Your research paper or essay will need to delve into numerous supporting claims. This broad thesis statement runs the risk of allowing you to go off on several tangents.
Good: Retirees should relocate to Florida, where 75% of Americans choose to settle, because you will afford yourself the opportunity to develop a wide array of friendships.
– From here, you can introduce a paragraph on the importance of friendship and then cite studies or testimonials describing how people can discover these important new relationships.

  • Avoid merely announcing the topic; your original and specific “angle” should be clear. In this way you will tell your reader why your take on the issue matters.
    • Original thesis: In this paper, I will discuss the relationship between fairy tales and early childhood.
    • Revised thesis: Not just empty stories for kids, fairy tales shed light on the psychology of young children.
  • Avoid making universal or pro/con judgments that oversimplify complex issues.
    • Original thesis: We must save the whales.
    • Revised thesis: Because our planet’s health may depend upon biological diversity, we should save the whales.
  • When you make a (subjective) judgment call, specify and justify your reasoning. “Just because” is not a good reason for an argument.
    • Original thesis: Socialism is the best form of government for Kenya.
    • Revised thesis: If the government takes over industry in Kenya, the industry will become more efficient.
  • Avoid merely reporting a fact. Say more than what is already proven fact. Go further with your ideas. Otherwise… why would your point matter?
    • Original thesis: Hoover’s administration was rocked by scandal.
    • Revised thesis: The many scandals of Hoover’s administration revealed basic problems with the Republican Party’s nominating process.

Do not expect to come up with a fully formulated thesis statement before you have finished writing the paper. The thesis will inevitably change as you revise and develop your ideas—and that is ok! Start with a tentative thesis and revise as your paper develops.

Steps in Constructing a Thesis
Anticipate the counterarguments. Once you have a working thesis, you should think about what might be said against it. This will help you to refine your thesis, and it will also make you think of the arguments that you’ll need to refute later on in your essay. (Every argument has a counterargument. If yours doesn’t, then it’s not an argument—it may be a fact, or an opinion, but it is not an argument.)

Essay thesis
Just as there are two different types of thesis statements (informative and persuasive), there are two basic styles you can use.

Good vs. evil is the main theme of Lewis’s Narnia series, as is made clear through the struggles the main characters face in each book.

Essay thesis
If you are still uncertain about how to write a thesis statement or what a good thesis statement is, be sure to consult with your teacher or professor to make sure you’re on the right track. It’s always a good idea to check in and make sure that your thesis statement is making a solid argument and that it can be supported by your research.
Your thesis statement should clearly identify an argument. You need to have a statement that is not only easy to understand, but one that is debatable. What that means is that you can’t just put any statement of fact and have it be your thesis. For example, everyone knows that puppies are cute. An ineffective thesis statement would be, “Puppies are adorable and everyone knows it.” This isn’t really something that’s a debatable topic.

References:

http://www.cws.illinois.edu/workshop/writers/tips/thesis/
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/developing-thesis
http://www.easybib.com/guides/how-to-write-a-strong-thesis-statement/
http://www.servicescape.com/blog/25-thesis-statement-examples-that-will-make-writing-a-breeze
http://examples.yourdictionary.com/essay-examples.html

how write essay

how write essay

Another common area of concern is quotation marks. It’s important to cite your sources with accuracy and clarity. Follow these guidelines on how to use quotes in essays and speeches.
Don’t jumble too many ideas in each paragraph or the reader may become confused.

Each paragraph addresses only one idea, argument or issue.
The first sentence of the introduction should pique the interest of your reader. This sentence is sometimes called the hook. It might be a question, a quote, a surprising statistic, or a bold statement emphasizing the relevance of the topic.

A typical essay contains many different kinds of information, often located in specialized parts or sections. Even short essays perform several different operations: introducing the argument, analyzing data, raising counterarguments, concluding. Introductions and conclusions have fixed places, but other parts don’t. Counterargument, for example, may appear within a paragraph, as a free-standing section, as part of the beginning, or before the ending. Background material (historical context or biographical information, a summary of relevant theory or criticism, the definition of a key term) often appears at the beginning of the essay, between the introduction and the first analytical section, but might also appear near the beginning of the specific section to which it’s relevant.
“How?” A reader will also want to know whether the claims of the thesis are true in all cases. The corresponding question is “how”: How does the thesis stand up to the challenge of a counterargument? How does the introduction of new material—a new way of looking at the evidence, another set of sources—affect the claims you’re making? Typically, an essay will include at least one “how” section. (Call it “complication” since you’re responding to a reader’s complicating questions.) This section usually comes after the “what,” but keep in mind that an essay may complicate its argument several times depending on its length, and that counterargument alone may appear just about anywhere in an essay.

How write essay
Having a similarly ambitious ‘study buddy’ is often undervalued by students, but the synergy achieved by working together can help both of you achieve considerably higher grades. It is important to note that you shouldn’t write your essays together, nor necessarily agree on the approach to be taken beforehand, as this leads to the risk of submitting two papers that are too similar – again linking back to the issue of plagiarism.
These are some of the common phrases found in essay questions, and each indicates a different set of expectations. If you are asked to critically evaluate a particular theoretical approach, for instance, you have to gain an understanding not only of said theory, but also other common approaches. They must all be weighed against each other, highlighting the relative strengths and weaknesses of each theory and, importantly, you must come to a well-justified and confident conclusion. Is the theory good? What are its flaws? How can it be improved?

How write essay
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Tip: Some writers find it helpful to write the introduction after they’ve written the rest of the essay. Once you’ve written out your main points, it’s easier to summarize the gist of your essay in a few introductory sentences.

References:

http://www.scribbr.com/category/academic-essay/
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/essay-writing-tips/
http://www.wikihow.com/Write-an-Essay
http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/writing/how-to-write-an-essay.html

essay structure types

essay structure types

Essay structure types

  • A basic explanation essay refers to the process of interpreting some process step-by-step (providing detailed instructions). Such assignments answer the “how” questions. The straightforward topics of this sort could be the way The President of the United States is elected; write about the way chocolate factory creates its best candies.
  • A definition essay is the simplest one, but do not come up with a single definition copied from the English dictionary. Plagiarism will result in F. A writer should include both the official definitions (several of them) and personal understanding of the specific word/phrase: define “justice,” “hatred,” or “school bullying” in the essay.
  • The cause-&-effect essay is the one, which proves that things are interrelated in this world. In such an essay, a writer should draw a parallel between some subjects/events by specifying the reasons for some things to happen and the consequences. An example of such essay could be the causes & effects of the Civil War in the US.
  • Reflection essay (or personal response essay) is in the realm of subjectivity on one side. A writer still has to explain the main topic of the essay based on the credible evidence and facts. Focus on personal opinion regarding the analyzed piece in such essay.
  • A critical analysis essay is an essay, which goal is to make a writer understand the covered material. A teacher/student chooses a related piece of text (from book chapter to scholarly article) to write, analyze, and interpret the results in own way. The teacher compares the essay to the actual interpretation of work. Go line by line to provide a clear explanation of this type of essay.
  • Brainstorm no matter whether your professor assigns a particular topic, or you are the one to choose an idea. Write down the list of ideas and conduct research to detect the amount of available information.
  • If the topic is broad, narrow it down to make a concise story.
  • Discover a creative angle; do not overwhelm the essay with personal opinion, but offer a minimum one new approach based on own judgments.
  • Stay honest in the personal statement – never lie about things you cannot do as the college/university professors will reveal the lies sooner or later.
  • Revise the essay before submitting it to the admissions officer/teacher.
  • Contact field experts before moving to the next stage.
  • Develop a presentation and supporting speech to perform in front of your class as it helps to prove your major points.
  • Protect your essay with the copyright (all right reserved will prevent your work from being stolen or duplicated).

A common structural flaw in college essays is the “walk-through” (also labeled “summary” or “description”). Walk-through essays follow the structure of their sources rather than establishing their own. Such essays generally have a descriptive thesis rather than an argumentative one. Be wary of paragraph openers that lead off with “time” words (“first,” “next,” “after,” “then”) or “listing” words (“also,” “another,” “in addition”). Although they don’t always signal trouble, these paragraph openers often indicate that an essay‘s thesis and structure need work: they suggest that the essay simply reproduces the chronology of the source text (in the case of time words: first this happens, then that, and afterwards another thing . . . ) or simply lists example after example (“In addition, the use of color indicates another way that the painting differentiates between good and evil”).
A typical essay contains many different kinds of information, often located in specialized parts or sections. Even short essays perform several different operations: introducing the argument, analyzing data, raising counterarguments, concluding. Introductions and conclusions have fixed places, but other parts don’t. Counterargument, for example, may appear within a paragraph, as a free-standing section, as part of the beginning, or before the ending. Background material (historical context or biographical information, a summary of relevant theory or criticism, the definition of a key term) often appears at the beginning of the essay, between the introduction and the first analytical section, but might also appear near the beginning of the specific section to which it’s relevant.

Essay structure types
Effectively writing different types of essays has become critical to academic success. Essay writing is a common school assignment, a part of standardized tests, and a requirement on college applications. Often on tests, choosing the correct type of essay to write in response to a writing prompt is key to getting the question right. Clearly, students can’t afford to remain confused about types of essays.
Four Major Types of Essays
Distinguishing between types of essays is simply a matter of determining the writer’s goal. Does the writer want to tell about a personal experience, describe something, explain an issue, or convince the reader to accept a certain viewpoint? The four major types of essays address these purposes:

Finally, consider that some essay assignments may ask you to combine approaches, especially in more advanced classes. At that point, you may have to vary your body paragraph strategy from section to section.

    1. Introduction
      • Background information about the problem
      • Description of the problem and why it is serious
      • Overview of the solutions to be outlined
    2. Body paragraphs
      • paragraph 1
        1. Topic sentence outlining first solution
        2. Explanation of the positive and negative aspects of the solution
        3. Evidence to support explanations
        4. Concluding sentence
      • paragraph 2
        1. Topic sentence outlining second solution
        2. Explanation of the positive and negative aspects of the solution
        3. Evidence to support explanation
        4. Concluding sentence
      • Following body paragraphs
        1. These follow the same structure for as many solutions as you need to discuss
    3. Conclusion
      • Summary of the problem and overview of the solutions
      • Evaluation of solutions and recommendation of best option

There are many different types of essay structure. Students may find some of these hard to comprehend and difficult to implement. Fortunately, essays can be categorized into four main groups. Further distinctions within these categories can be appreciated once an understanding of these main types is grasped. Knowing the different types of essay structures can help writers decide upon the most appropriate type for the topic and help organize the structure of the essay.
There are many different types of essay structure. Students may find some of these hard to comprehend and difficult to implement. Fortunately, essays can be categorized into four main groups. Further distinctions within these categories can be appreciated once an understanding of these main types is grasped. Knowing the different types of essay structures can help writers decide upon the most appropriate type for the topic and help organize the structure of the essay.

References:

http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://www.time4writing.com/writing-resources/types-of-essays/
http://courses.lumenlearning.com/vccs-enf102-17fa/chapter/text-types-of-essays-and-suggested-structures/
http://classroom.synonym.com/different-types-essay-structure-8432977.html
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure

building an essay

building an essay

Building an essay
Either way, your essay will have the same basic format.
You may download a .pdf formatted file containing these instructions which can then be easily printed.

Writing an academic essay means fashioning a coherent set of ideas into an argument. Because essays are essentially linear—they offer one idea at a time—they must present their ideas in the order that makes most sense to a reader. Successfully structuring an essay means attending to a reader’s logic.
Mapping an Essay

Many technologies are available for heating building or house. Boilers are pressure vessels intended to heat water or deliver steam which can then be used to give space heating and additionally benefit water heating to a building. In most business building heating applications, the heating source in the boiler is a natural gas fired burner. Oil fired burners and electric resistance radiators can be used too. Steam is favored over heated water
 Building Software versus Building a House Natty Martinez CSS/422 May 11, 2015 Annie O’Rourke Building Software versus Building a House Building software and building a house have many similarities as well as differences. There are four aspects that I found in which there are some similarities and differences. These aspects are planning, materials, design, and schedules. There are many more aspects that can be used as well as what the aspects have. Similarities In

Tip: Revision should come before proofreading: why polish what you might be changing anyway?

  • Keep tools at hand, such as a dictionary, a thesaurus, and a writing handbook.
  • If you’re using word processing, remember that computers are wonderful resources for editing and revising.
  • When you feel you’ve done everything you can, first by revising and then by proofreading, and have a nice clean final draft, put it aside and return later to re-see the whole essay. There may be some last minute fine tuning that can make all the difference.

Building an essay
Every builder has a set of tools to construct a house. It would be impossible for the team of builders to build a solid house with a hammer only. Wood, stone, nails, hammer – these are all important tools in the building process. Writers have their own set of tools for creating an essay paper: words, word combinations, various literary devices, writing techniques, etc. An expert builder knows how to use the variety of tools in order to build a good house so does a good writer know how to utilize all literary tools and techniques available to produce a good essay paper. Foundation. We all know how crucially important a foundation is to any building. You don’t need to be an expert to understand that no matter how pretty the house is from the outside it won’t last long without a solid foundation. The building will collapse very soon without a good foundation so will the essay without a strong idea. No one starts building a house without laying a good foundation because it makes no sense. Unfortunately, there are so many students that are constructing their written strongholds having no clue what kind of things they are building (which is practically the same as building a house without a foundation). Nobody starts building the main part of the house and then at some point goes back to foundation; this is the first thing builders work on. If we are talking about writing an essay, a thesis statement is a good analogy for a solid foundation. The thesis statement is usually one sentence that summarizes the entire idea of the writing. Everything you choose to include in your essay should revolve around (be built on the foundation of) the thesis. This is where it all should start. Prior to taking your pen or opening your new word document on your computer, you should think everything through. Just like builders know he/she should build a good foundation first, students need to know what the essay is going to be about beforehand. One has to be very careful when writing a thesis statement as it should be debatable and allow for strong evidence to be presented. Weak thesis will inevitably lead to poor essay paper outcomes just like a bad foundation will result in a ruined house. Now having a well prepared thesis is like laying a strong foundation: when you do it right then the whole thing will stand firm. Plan. Even before laying a foundation architects have to develop a plan following which everything else is built. A blueprint is all about laying out the whole structure in advance showing how it is going to be constructed. There is no as much place for creativity when building a house if compared to the essay writing process. All creativity is to be utilized when developing a specific plan. There are very few things that can be changed in the process of building as soon as the project is launched so the plan should really include all creativity. Writing an essay allows more space for creativity obviously but it doesn’t mean that the plan isn’t necessary. Quite the opposite, an essay should also have a blueprint – an idea of how the structure of your essay is going to look like. It is usually presented in the form of statement that outlines how you are going to prove your thesis. It helps both the writer and reader to understand where the essay is going and how it is going to end up at the final destination point. Having read your essay “blueprint” at the beginning of your document, readers will know what to expect. It will also help the writer himself/herself to organize one’s thoughts carefully. Keep in mind, this is something you work on prior to the writing process occurs. Structure. Having a written blueprint and laid foundation is a good thing because it allows you to get to the building part. Now as you probably know builders don’t start from the roof or windows. There has to be the main structure built that is meant to support the entire house. This is sort of a skeleton of the building that consists of supporting posts and beams that make up the main structure of the house. Only after they are through this stage, the builders can move on to constructing walls, windows and roof, which if taken the anatomy analogy resemble the skin of a human body. Writing an essay again is very similar to building and this stage of constructing the supporting structure should be a great example of how the points of your essay are to support your thesis. The points you are making in your essay are those supporting posts and rafter beams. And the stronger they are, the more solid your essay is going to be. Like the strength of a house is tested by the winds and storms so is the points of your essay is tested by the waves of criticism and feedback. If you work hard on developing your key points then your piece of writing will weather the storm of any feedback. Strong supporting structure have always been among the decisive factors for determining the reliability of the house. The same principle stands for writing an essay. The entire argument depends on the points you make throughout the document. A simple essay would contain 3-5 reasons why your thesis statement is true. These reasons (points) are to be valid (strong) in order to make your entire essay look solid. If you did your homework and researched the topic well it won’t constitute a big problem for you to come up with those reasons. Keep in mind that literary devices are all good and they help to make your essay better but without having a blueprint, foundation, and good supporting structure they don’t do any good at all. Those nice words and complex devices are like beautiful building color that doesn’t really matter when it all falls apart.
Have you ever thought what writers have in common with architects and builders? It doesn’t seem at first that there are many similarities between writing and building. These two processes appear to be as far from each other as the east is from the west. If you take an author and builder or architect for comparison, these people seem to be doing something completely different. The truth of the matter is that writers are very much alike builders and architects who carefully plan every single process and make sure the final outcome both complies with all regulations and is attractive for other people’s eyes. Maybe you have never thought in this way but the processes involved in building a house and writing an essay are very similar. More than that, knowing how houses are built may help you understand the process for writing an essay. The patterns for building a house can serve a great example on how to approach essay writing regardless of what kind of assignment you have. So if you think you would like to know how it all comes together then keep on reading…

References:

http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://www.bartleby.com/essay/BUILDING-A-HOUSE-PKX8GYZVJ
http://www.esc.edu/online-writing-center/resources/research/research-paper-steps/building-draft/
http://essaywritingstore.com/blog/academic-writing/writing-essay-building-house
http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/writing/how-to-write-an-essay.html

how write a good essay

how write a good essay

Write your essay
Outline your essay

Mapping an Essay
It’s helpful to think of the different essay sections as answering a series of questions your reader might ask when encountering your thesis. (Readers should have questions. If they don’t, your thesis is most likely simply an observation of fact, not an arguable claim.)

To give your essay a clear structure, it is important to make use of paragraphs and headings. This makes the content scannable and easy to digest. Each paragraph should be centered around just one argument or idea.
Paragraphs and headings are used to structure the essay.

How write a good essay
This part must be given much importance as the introduction part. The conclusion gives you a chance, to sum up, your ideas and close up the topic. Make it short; write three to five sentences. Do not introduce any new ideas at the conclusion; summarize your prior arguments. You have the chance to restate your thesis statement and once again support your stance.
Each teacher gives out homework, and at the end of the day, the students are overburdened. To lessen this burden order a paper from custom essay writing service and spend your time revising for your exams. Using professional essay writer can also save you from the unhealthy sleepless nights and embarrassing grades plus late submissions.

How write a good essay
Both the quoted and the paraphrased versions carry essentially the same meaning, with the exception that paraphrasing shows slightly wider knowledge of Bourdieu (through mentioning another form of capital), and presents an argument that, while true to the writings of Bourdieu, better fits the overall argument.
How you present your argument is nearly as important as the argument itself, which is why it is imperative that your essay follows a logical structure. A classic piece of advice is to “tell them what you are going to tell them, then tell them, and tell them what you told them”. This, in essence, summarises the core introduction, main body, and conclusion structure of your essay.

References:

http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://www.scribbr.com/category/academic-essay/
http://www.bmmagazine.co.uk/in-business/8-tips-for-writing-an-excellent-essay/
http://www.oxbridgeessays.com/blog/essay-writing-tips/
http://www.scribbr.com/category/academic-essay/

what does a good essay need

what does a good essay need

The introductory paragraph accomplishes three purposes: it captures the reader’s interest, it suggests the importance of the essay’s topic, and it ends with a thesis sentence. Often, the thesis sentence states a claim that consists of two or more related points. For example, a thesis might read:
Wikipedia is a powerful resource in many ways.

What does a good essay need
This is the most crucial stage in essay writing. Once you know the question asked you can be able to identify the type of essay. Highlight the keywords; ‘compare,’ ‘contrast’ ‘discuss,’ ‘explain’ ‘evaluate’ and identify any limiting words, e.g., during the 21st century, within Europe, etc.
After creating a thesis statement and the body of the essay write an introductory paragraph. Make your introduction fascinating to capture the attention of your readers. Begin with a ‘hook’; you can use a story, dialogue, shocking revelation, a quote or a topic summary. Make sure that your ‘hook’ ties with the thesis statement.

The body of your essay is where you explain, describe or argue the topic you’ve chosen. Each of the main ideas you included in your outline or diagram will become of the body paragraphs. If you wrote down four main ideas in your outline or diagram, then you’ll have four body paragraphs.
The word “thesis” just sounds intimidating to most students, but a thesis is actually quite simple. A thesis statement (1) tells the reader what the essay is about and (2) what points you’ll be making. If you’ve already selected an essay topic, and developed an outline or diagram, you now can decide what points you want to communicate through your essay.

What does a good essay need
In the process of writing an academic essay, you should always have your main argument in mind. While it might be tempting to go off on a tangent about some interesting side note to your topic, doing so can make your writing less concise. Always question any evidence you include in your essay; ask yourself, “Does this directly support my thesis?” If the answer is “no,” then that evidence should probably be excluded. When you are evaluating evidence, be critical and thorough. You want to use the strongest research to back up your thesis. Everything you include should have a clear connection to your topic and your argument.
If you’ve been told time and time again that you express great ideas in your essay writing but your writing needs polishing, you aren’t alone. The following tips will help improve your writing skills and turn you into a great writer.

What does a good essay need
Even the most famous examples need context. For example, George Washington’s life was extremely complex – by using him as an example, do you intend to refer to his honesty, bravery, or maybe even his wooden teeth? The reader needs to know this and it is your job as the writer to paint the appropriate picture for them. To do this, it is a good idea to provide the reader with five or six relevant facts about the life (in general) or event (in particular) you believe most clearly illustrates your point.
For the first body paragraph you should use your strongest argument or most significant example unless some other more obvious beginning point (as in the case of chronological explanations) is required. The first sentence of this paragraph should be the topic sentence of the paragraph that directly relates to the examples listed in the mini-outline of introductory paragraph.

References:

http://www.bmmagazine.co.uk/in-business/8-tips-for-writing-an-excellent-essay/
http://www.educationcorner.com/writing-an-essay.html
http://www.scribendi.com/advice/academic_essay_writing_skills.en.html
http://www.internationalstudent.com/essay_writing/essay_tips/
http://lklivingston.tripod.com/essay/